Trump’s Lawyer Reveals Glaring Problem With Twitter’s Terms Of Service

(PatriotWise.com)- Lawyers representing former President Donald Trump are continuing the fight against Big Tech and social media giants who censor conservatives, and this time they’re arguing that service agreement rules don’t apply to him.

The former president’s lawyers are working to put the former president back on the popular social media platform, which for many years has served as his preferred mode of communicating with the general public.

In a court filing, which was submitted on behalf of the former president and a number of other people, attorneys argue that Twitter’s service agreement didn’t apply to the former president because he is the 45th President of the United States. The suit says that during his time in the White House, Trump would often use his Twitter account to “report to the Citizens of the United States on virtually every aspect of Presidential activity.”

That’s a claim opposing counsel definitely can’t reject.

The attorneys go on to say that it is “undeniably clear” that Trump’s account was a government account and not a private one at the time he was censored – which occurred before he left the White House.

The filing was made by Trump’s lawyers in an effort to stop the case from being moved from Florida courts to California. Under Twitter’s service agreement, all disputed relating to the terms of service must be directed to a California federal or state court.

Trump attorneys argue that California does not have any interest in how Florida regulates businesses in its borders and that courts in the state “should not be burdened with enforcing Florida’s laws.”

Former President Donald Trump is a resident of Florida.

Now we’ll just need to wait and see what the courts say – though it goes without saying that if the case gets moved to California, it’s unlikely that the former president will simply give up.

Can you imagine the meltdowns if former President Donald Trump is given his Twitter account back by way of a court order?